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Go Red for Women is Life-Changing Information

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Go Red for Women

Make a Difference in You and Your Family’s Life on February 7

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States. Despite increases in awareness over the past decades, only about half (56%) of women recognize that heart disease is the No. 1 killer, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Many believe it’s cancer, yet heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined.

For this reason, The American Heart Association created the Go Red for Women awareness campaign. The campaign is designed to increase women’s heart health awareness and serve as a catalyst for change to improve the lives of women.

In 2020, Go Red for Women awareness day is Friday, Feb. 7. Wear Red and join the movement to increase the visibility of heart disease in women and steps you can take to reduce your risk.

According to the CDC:

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, killing 299,578 women in 2017—or about 1 in every 5 female deaths.
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African-American and white women in the U.S. Among American-Indian and Alaska-Native women, heart disease and cancer cause roughly the same number of deaths each year. For Hispanic and Asian or Pacific-Islander women, heart disease is second only to cancer as a cause of death.
  • About 1 in 16 women age 20 and older (6.2%) have coronary heart disease, the most common type of heart disease.
  • About 1 in 16 white women (6.1%), black women (6.5%), and Hispanic women (6%)
  • About 1 in 30 Asian women (3.2%)

Go Red for Women is no longer just about wearing red; it’s about women making a commitment to stand together and take charge of their own heart health, as well as the health of those they can’t bear to live without, according to the American Heart Association.

5 Heart Healthy Life Changes for Women

The Heart Association has a variety of suggestions to reduce you and your family’s risks for developing heart disease:

  1. GET YOUR NUMBERS - Ask your doctor to check your blood pressure and cholesterol.
  2. OWN YOUR LIFESTYLE - Stop smoking, lose weight, exercise, and eat healthy. It’s up to you. No one can do it for you.
  3. REALIZE YOUR RISK - We think it won’t happen to us, but heart disease kills one of three women.
  4. EDUCATE YOUR FAMILY - Make healthy food choices for you and your family. Teach your kids the importance of staying active.
  5. DON’T BE SILENT - Tell every woman you know that heart disease is our No. 1 killer.

To learn more, click here. To find a cardiologist, click here.